Ben Affleck
Affleck has played the Dark Knight since 2016’s Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and would go on to reprise the role in Suicide Squad and Justice League. He was positioned to helm the first standalone Batman DCEU film before / Image: Warner Bros. Pictures

Ben Affleck is opening up about why he chose not to be part of production for The Batman. Affleck has played the Dark Knight since 2016’s Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and would go on to reprise the role in Suicide Squad and Justice League. He was positioned to helm the first standalone Batman DCEU film before suddenly backing away in 2020.

While there have been some conflicting reports, it seems that Affleck has parted ways with the project due to his reluctance to direct a Batman movie. We hate to break it to all you Batfleck fans out there, but before this project was put on the fast track by Matt Reeves and transformed into the upcoming The Batman starring Robert Pattinson, Ben Affleck had been attached as writer and director for his own version of The Dark Knight. Unfortunately for us, he decided to pass on directing a Batman film because he wanted to move forward and pursue other projects instead.

Ben Affleck said:

“I was hurt. I was less hurt than I would’ve been 10 years earlier. But I was hurt because I felt like ‘Wait a minute, come on. What do I got to do to’ you know what I mean? Like, I’m just you know, like, ‘Jesus Christ’ … I thought it was an interesting idea but you know what? I also realized at that point … it’s gonna be, ‘Now this turns into a petition.’ Now they got this thing, everybody’s going to do a petition. You’re really -– a hundred thousand [signatures], you signed a f***ing petition like, you have anything better to do with your day than sign petitions? But, ironically, the reason I did this is I wanted to do a movie for my kids, particularly my son, that they would see and be proud of.

I looked at (directing Batman) and thought, “I’m not going to be happy doing this. The person who does this should love it.” You’re supposed to always want these things, and I probably would have loved doing it at 32 or something. But it was the point where I started to realize it’s not worth it. It’s just a wonderful benefit of reorienting and recalibrating your priorities that once it started being more about the experience, I felt more at ease.”

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